Home / Politics / Why I Left America for Good

Why I Left America for Good

volgograd

“Whether you are ‘racist’ or not, if your city, town, region or country becomes fractured and demographically disparate, it will degrade in real time before your eyes. Trust will be gone. Racism and tension flourishes. Authoritarianism is needed to ‘balance’ the crime and tension and violence. Is that the kind of future anyone wants, simply to appeal to a fake ideal? To the lie of multiculturalism?”

I left America for many reasons; the largest reasons were the anti-white political correctness and the mass immigration. There are many, many other reasons I left as well — but these are the first and foremost. The others are really secondary or tertiary in my impetus to leave.I’ve lived in Russia now for 2 years, and I’ve rarely traveled outside my home city, Astrakhan, and Moscow. Recently, I took a short vacation 6 hours up the Volga to a little town called Volgograd — which westerners may know by the famous name “Stalingrad” the site of the bloodiest battle in Human history. The city has been renamed because Stalin isn’t politically correct anymore, but the Soviet monuments and museums still do stand, and I wanted to see them, being so close and needing a break from Astrakhan.

My train to Volgograd was peaceful. Quiet, calm, relaxing — it was a sleepy European city. When we arrived we went to the famous “motherland calls” statue that commemorates the battle and lives lost. We then went into town, and traveled around to our apartment for rent, and settled in.

Later, a walk through the town was pleasant and quiet. We noticed something increasingly; it was much more peaceful than astrakhan, nicer, newer, more modern, greener even — and far cleaner and more orderly. It truly felt like Europe used to feel ten or more years ago.

During the trip I kept remarking to my girlfriend that this town was so nice. The people were so nice. And we also noted there were more white people. It is not politically incorrect to discuss this openly in Russia, so we did so. She noted that people seemed much kinder, more trusting, more open and helpful.

I went to Wikipedia to look up demographics to confirm my suspicion of why this was.

Demographics of Volgograd Oblast were:

Russians 2,309,253 90%
Kazakhs 46,223 1.8%
Ukrainians 35,607 1.4%
Tatars 24,557 0.9%
Armenians 27,846 1.1%
Azerbaijani 14,398 0.6%
Germans 10,102 0.4%
Chechen 9,649 0.4%
Belarusians 7,868 0.4%

Compare this to Astrakhan Oblast:

Russian 67.6%
Kazakh 16.3%
Tatar 6.6%
Ukrainian 0.9%
Nogay 0.8%
Chechen 0.8%
Azeri 0.9%
Kalmyk 0.7%
Armenian 0.6%
Roma 0.6%
Avar 0.5%
Lezgin 0.5%
Dargin 0.5%
Belarusians 0.3%
Others 2.4%

Before I talk about this further — there are obvious reasons that keep me in Astrakhan over America, and they are all due to the lack of cultural liberalism in Russia, my love of Russian culture, and my bond to this country. So I do still love living here compared to the USA and most of Western Europe. Because even though it may be too multicultural for my taste, it’s still better than America because of the culture.

However, my town is not “Europe” at all except in name only. It’s a third world city compared to the wondrous Volgograd, which is extremely European, quiet, cozy, artful, aesthetic, clean — and with nice and trusting people or as the alt-right might put it: “a high trust society”. Astrakhan is sub-par in most things. Crime is common, and I myself have been in fist fights with “racial epithets” shall we say, several times, which I was thankfully aided by ethnic Russians when they saw me fighting (something to never happen in the USA or Europe), because I am Slavic, as they are.

Demographics are truly destiny. 6 hours from a fairly homogeneous, beautiful, nice city, lay a third world city that is worlds apart — entirely worlds apart. I have experienced this positive culture shock before, but in different ways by comparing my ruined native USA to Eastern Europe for example, but an example this glaring, this close to one other city — this is really something to take to heart. To compare, Astrakhan and Volgograd are the same size population wise (roughly 1 million), and Astrakhan has more foreign aid from the regional countries than Volgograd does from Russia as a whole. Azerbaijan, Iran, and other local Caspian sea countries invest in this city — yet it is dramatically less in quality in so many things. Prices are the exact same in each town for everything as well, showcasing that the main variable is demographics.

Demographics determine the future no matter what we might design otherwise. Once it passes a certain tipping point, violence, harsh authoritarianism or mass action by the government becomes necessary, or else civil war can happen. It’s doubtful this will happen in a widespread way in Russia because these kind of multi-ethnic enclaves aren’t spread all over Russia, but in a country such as America — it very much is going to happen. One thing is for sure, Police are all over Astrakhan and highly visible (yet I’ve never had them come aid me when needed, naturally), but in Volgograd, police were far less common. Why? Simply there is not that much of a need.

Naysayers can say “that’s because the city doesn’t care about them, being minorities”. Well… I know some of the main judges, lawyers and administrators personally in Astrakhan. Almost all of them are “minorities” or married to them.

Whether you are “racist” or not, if your city, town, region or country becomes fractured and demographically disparate, it will degrade in real time before your eyes. Trust will be gone. Racism and tension flourishes. Authoritarianism is needed to “balance” the crime and tension and violence. Is that the kind of future anyone wants, simply to appeal to a fake ideal? To the lie of multiculturalism?

Personally, I plan to move to Volgograd as soon as I can.

  • Deplorable KEK

    Astrakhan is at the very border of Europe, quite exotic to move there. Bold move.

  • Nemon

    America is a walking corpse.