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Oy Vey over Taipei

  • Nemon

    “Look at a map and tell me which country you think is the actual China.

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    The worst thing about Nixon’s China opening is that he sold Chiang Kai-Shek down the river and got jack shit in return. Zhou Enlai refused to move forward beyond the Paris channel or the New York back channel (Kissinger met with Huang Hua in an apartment used by whores near the UN, heh) until Kissinger finally truly broke through with North Vietnam in early 1973. Even after the Paris Peace Accords, the PRC was
    shipping arms into Haiphong, which were of course used in the eventual rout of South Vietnam in 1975.

    One of the first things the PRC did when we opened the liaison offices was to start flooding the U.S. market with cheap textiles, and they refused to even release some of our pilots who’d been captured during the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and didn’t release some of our funds which they’d seized in the 1949 takeover, which the “poor suffering Jews in the Soviet Union”-inspired Jackson-Vanik bill only made more difficult.

    They were still a completely backwards country by modern standards, made even more so by the Cultural Revolution, and now in dire straits after the border clash
    with the Soviet Union and fiery disagreements over the Soviet intervention in the Prague Spring in ’68. Despite all that, they knew that Nixon and Kissinger were coming to them from a point of weakness, with the country exhausted by the Vietnam War, which they pushed to full advantage by dictating the terms of negotiation. They shit-talked us in the UN right before and after meeting Winston Lord and our people,
    insisted that all meetings be held by U.S. officials making the trip to Beijing, were belligerent in island clashes with South Vietnam, and took advantage of the U.S. in the cultural exchange programs by hosting Black Panthers and other radicals. They sent loads of students to the U.S. to learn all our secrets while strictly controlling and monitoring the few people of ours they allowed into China, whom they conspicuously
    had their merchants and hotel owners rip off for “revenge” after the “century of humiliation” before and after the Boxer Rebellion.

    All the progress in relations died with Watergate, Ford’s post-Nixon pardon weakness, Reagan’s challenge to Ford, and the deaths of Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai, and disruption after the Gang of Four’s attempted coup.

    By the time Carter got into office, he wanted to fully establish relations with the PRC and drop the ROC entirely, which he did, for reasons of “sentiment” from his missionary days, as he recorded in his notably piously titled “Keeping Faith.” Zbigniew Brzezinski, Frank Press, and Leonard Woodcock ended up having sly little Deng Xiaoping get a complete runaround on them. We had a modest trade surplus with the PRC at the time, but Carter had Commerce Secretary Juanita Kreps, Treasury Secretary Michael (((Blumenthal))), and Energy Secretary James (((Schlesinger))) trade the farm to Deng, some of our most precious offshore oil, landsat, and other technology, in return for what soon became a treasure trove of intellectual property theft, a massive trade deficit, and not a bit of improvement in the “human rights” that Carter initially based his foreign policy upon, as Tiananmen Square took the mask off the image of Deng Xiaoping as a reformer in anything but modernizing the PRC’s economy. Decades later, we continue to get ripped off by them while we rip ourselves off keeping Japan’s SDF down with Article 9, keep the South Korean forces intact despite the end of the Cold War, as we take it in the pants from China and send treasure out of the country while they pirate and steal and counter us on the UNSC
    they’re only on because Nixon long ago thought they’d help put pressure on North Vietnam, which they didn’t.

    One funny little incident occurred when the wife of one of our diplomats tried to visit a PRC official in Beijing in 1976. She was herself Chinese, so she was refused entry because “everyone knows Americans are White.” Marine guards later returned the favor to Huang Zhen in the Washington, DC embassy, but it’s curious to think that as recently as just a few decades ago it was inconceivable to people that anyone but a White person could possibly be an American.