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Truth is Justice

Will Europe belong to Europeans?

Viktor Orbán’s speech at the 28th Bálványos Summer Open University and Student Camp, July 22, 2017, Tusnádfürdő (Băile Tuşnad, Romania) First of all, I’d like to remind everyone that we started a process of collective thinking 27 years ago in Bálványosfürdő, a few kilometres from here. That is where we came to a realisation. Just think back: at that time, at the beginning of the nineties, most people – not only in Hungary, but also across the whole of Central Europe – thought that full assimilation into the Western world was just opening up to us again. The obvious approach was …

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“Immigration, Identity, Islam”

Douglas Murray’s new book, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam is a terrifying tour de force of the Islamification of Europe. Many who consider themselves educated and informed will roll their eyes and scoff at such a description of the demographic transformation of Europe, and hastily reply, without any irony, that such a transformation is not taking place, but that it if it were, it would be good. Murray’s book challenges, in the most sympathetic way possible, this suicidal self-satisfaction and self-deceit.

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The Soul of Jack London, Part 4

Jack London was a fervent and active member of the American socialist movement for many years. He, however, possessed a radically different interpretation of socialist doctrine from that of the mainstream of the movement. Frederick Palmer, who served with him as a war correspondent during the Russo‑Japanese War, described him in his autobiography, With My Own Eyes, as: . . . the most inherently individualistic and un‑Socialistic of all the Socialists I have ever met. . . . [H]e preferred to walk alone in aristocratic aloofness, and always in the direction he chose no matter where anybody else was going. He had …

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The Soul of Jack London, Part 3

We saw in the first part[s] of this study that virtually all of Jack London’s writing, even his earliest work, gave explicit expression to his strong racial consciousness. Despite his otherwise very healthy racial and philosophical views, however, London’s understanding of the Jews required a long time to mature.

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America Is Not a “Proposition Nation”

When I was studying French in school we used an elementary reader that was published in France ages ago. On one page it had the pictures of the peoples of different nations with their corresponding names in French. These pictures were stereotypes—French, German, English, American, African, Chinese, Egyptian, etc.—of the demographic reality that existed. Those people were their nations, and needless to say, each person representing a European country was white. What is a nation? It is not defined by political boundaries but by its people. The Oxford Dictionaries define a nation as “a large aggregate of people united by common descent, …

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Notes on the “White Ally”

One of the stranger developments in American identity politics is the manufactured affiliation known as the “white ally.” But despite the moniker of “ally,” the white ally is not an independent political actor entering into alliance with another actor to achieve his or her interests through cooperation. The job of the white ally is simply to follow the orders of the dominant “partner” in this alliance, to sit down and shut up.

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The Soul of Jack London, Part 2

Race was of utmost importance to London. His unshakable views on the subject were expressed ardently even in some of his works of socialist propaganda. A good sampling of London’s racial perspective at the turn of the century may be found in his letters to Cloudesley Johns. Johns, a young post-office employee from southern California, wrote London a fan letter in 1899, praising one of the latter’s magazine articles. The result was a strong friendship that lasted until London’s death. The correspondence between Johns and London frequently dealt heavily with the subject of race. In one letter to Johns, dated …

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The Soul of Jack London, Part 1

The life of Jack London, the extraordinarily popular turn-of-the-century American author, was every bit as fascinating as those of the fictional characters depicted in his stories. He was a man of action as well as of thought. But lack London was much more than an author and adventurer. Born into poverty, he was molded into an ardent socialist at an early age. Possessing an instinctive craving for truth, he cast off the shackles of the religion in which he was raised and turned instead to the teachings of Friedrich Nietzsche and the logic of science. Endowed with both common sense …

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The Real Victims in Manchester

What does it mean to be a Mancunian? Perhaps it’s as simple as being a resident or former resident of Manchester. Or perhaps it’s characterized by a particular type of identity, one that is often embodied in the numerous musicians who have come from there in recent decades. Take Guy Garvey, singer of Elbow: The people in Manchester who will be most afraid because of what he [Salman Abedi, the Manchester bomber] did last night will be real Muslims, members of the real faith who don’t believe in violence and don’t believe in killing as a means to an end. …

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MAOA, Race, and Crime

One gene which plays a role in Black’s high crime rate is the monoamine oxidase -a gene (MAO-A). This gene produces an enzyme by the same name. The enzyme MAO-A breaks down a class of neurotransmitter called mono-amines in the brain. These neurotransmitters include ones which are well known to effect behavior such as dopamine and serotonin. Some versions of the MAO-A gene lead to lower levels of MAO-A the enzyme and, therefore, more mono-amine activity in the brain.

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God-Emperor from a Machine: The Alt Right, Aesthetics, & Memetics

Meme war is nothing new or original in human history, but the battlefields we wage it on have completely transformed. Peace is merely the absence of war, and in a democracy, all are at war in an implied sense. We form factions to decide who will rule and then by a simple majority declare a winner. How those factions are formed in our times depends largely on media consumption and the creation of political identities. Media becomes a conduit for political memes, what people believe the government should or should not do, how society should be ordered or disordered, etc. …

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Women’s Brains

Here is a very interesting paper on sex differences in brain size and intelligence, notable for linking people’s brain scans with their detailed intelligence test results. It has been accepted for publication in Intelligence.

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France Not So Much

Hillary Clinton put it best when she tweeted “Victory for Macron, for France, the EU, & the world. Defeat to those interfering w/democracy. (But the media says I can’t talk about that).” France voted for corrupt neo-liberal government aimed at unifying the world into a rootless trade bloc that tolerates the internal displacement of its own people by economic migrants, and one which skillfully uses the media to portray itself as the underdog fighting the massively satanic reactionary forces of hate, racism, and xenophobia. All people have a right to live in France on unemployment and conduct terrorist attacks on …

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Girl against Bull

Fearless Girl, a four-foot statue commissioned by State Street Global Advisors (SSGA), now stands facing Charging Bull in Lower Manhattan’s Bowling Green park, near Wall Street. Her appearance in the financial district in early March was timed to celebrate International Women’s Day. The longstanding tradition that a surging market is symbolized by a powerful bull – rather than, say, by a cow in calf – presents an irritating problem to feminists, a provocation that requires a feminist response. SSGA’s feminist response is a pony-tailed girl standing up to the bull. The statue is both a feminist statement and an advertisement …

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South African Apartheid: a case study on the effects of European colonialism in Africa

The impact of European colonialism on the world is often described as being profoundly negative. The popular view is that Europeans came, stole resources, destroyed cultures, and committed mass murder all over the earth. By contrast, the prevailing view 100 years ago was that Europe was supplying the world with advanced institutions which they would not develop on their own and, in so doing, was civilizing the world.

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What Race Were the Greeks and Romans?

  Recent films about ancient Greece such as Troy, Helen of Troy, and 300, have used actors who are of Anglo-Saxon or Celtic ancestry (e.g. Brad Pitt, Gerard Butler). Recent films about ancient Rome, such as Gladiator and HBO’s series Rome, have done the same (e.g. Russell Crowe). Were the directors right, from an historical point of view? Were the ancient Greeks and Romans of North European stock?

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Proportionality: The Fairness of Inequality

There was a time when boys played games of marbles following strict playground rules: contestants had to stand a prescribed distance away from the little pyramid of marbles, and chuck only marbles of the prescribed size. Rules ruled. Piaget was intrigued by the explanations children gave for moral judgements, and the playground is the arena in which the concept of fairness is honed.

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Welfare: Who’s on It, Who’s Not?

The Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) has published a report called “Welfare Use by Immigrant and Native Households.” The report’s principle finding is that fully 51 percent of immigrant households receive some form of welfare, compared to an already worrisomely high 30 percent of American native households. The study is based on the most accurate data available, the Census Bureau’s Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). It also reports stark racial differences in the use of welfare programs.

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Argentina: A Mirror of Your Future

Argentina is a distant mirror that reflects what may be North America’s future. The country is a small-scale laboratory of the effects of migration: A suitable migration policy can transform a nation for the good; a wrong one spoils it. Argentina became independent from Spain in 1816 just after Napoleons occupation of the Iberian Peninsula. After a period of struggle between caudillos, the country was unified with a constitution inspired, in part, by that of the United States. A generation of brilliant thinkers led by Juan Bautista Alberdi and Domingo Faustino Sarmiento saw European immigration as the key to modernity, …

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